I used to be an agent and one of the challenges I had, like most agents have today when they’re selling new homes, is how to make the one-off new house or small development, the ones that haven’t been furnished or dressed in any way, look sexy so that they stand out from the crowd. Read the rest of this entry »

I love sharing my knowledge with estate agents. I was one myself for 37 years and although I’ve spent the last 11 years or my business life photographing homes instead of selling them, I’m still at heart a property man.

So, when I get to spend a day with experienced people of similar mind who want to improve an aspect of their business with which I can help, it gives me enormous pleasure, especially when they’re genuinely good people with a desire to learn.

So, I was delighted to see that they asked me to run a property photography workshop for them and that they’ve taken to heart the skills they learned that day, by making special mention of it on their Internet site.

Eric Lloyd & Co in Brixham and Paignton, thank you for asking for my assistance. .

 

 

My grateful thanks to Resource Techniques for rooting out this piece of research by a university in the USA. http://goo.gl/RGJOi

I particularly like the pithy question with which they end their article.

This time of year it’s not the cloudy days that are the property photographer’s enemy, it’s the bright sunny ones.

This is especially the case if there are big trees or other tall structures causing high-contrast shadows over gardens and elevations when the bright Sun drops behind them – at this time of year that would be most of the daytime.

The problem is that there is, on a bright day, a difference of around 22 f-stops worth of available light in the real world* but the average digital camera records detail in a range equal to around 7 f-stops (less able cameras) to 14 (more able SLR cameras). The human eye can see the equivalent of around 20 f-stops in a scene, because it constantly adjusts as it focusses on different elements of it. In plain English, this translates to the unfortunate fact that in high-contrast scenes, a photograph’s detail can easily be lost with blocky shadows at one end of the scale or blown highlights at the other.

So – what to do? Read the rest of this entry »

The raison d’etre for estate agents everywhere, is to get the properties they sell, noticed ! Simples.

These days unless you’re selling property in central London where the upper end of the market is on fire (yes, I know, but I started writing this a couple of weeks ago), you’re likely to need to exploit every trick in the book to get your home noticed by the best available buyers. You could, for example, throw in with your sale a free Ferrari or Mini but that little trick was done to death in the ‘70’s; or you could make your home a raffle prize, but that’s not a new idea either and let’s face it, raffles are a bit down-market and much better suited to raising funds for the village hall roof repair.

Read the rest of this entry »

Link to Sister Article Getting your Home Noticed/Achieving the Best Selling Price

It is most definitely the case that some UK estate agents are catching up with the importance that property marketing, design and professional photography play in achieving the best result for sellers… see these chaps:  http://www.domusnova.com/ by way of example.

But as an intelligent vendor you will realise that even brilliant marketing will not alone send you laughing all the way to the bank. It might seem obvious, sadly for many it isn’t, but (with the possible exception of homes that are being sold for refurbishment) every seller needs to make sure that their house has been properly prepared for marketing (I’ve placed a link above where I’ve expanded on the reasons) – just as you would clean and polish your car if you were selling it.

Read the rest of this entry »